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iconCANADIAN ROLE Updated December 31, 2009

Section Contents:  

Canada's involvement in Sudan dates back to the beginnings of the UNMIS and UNMID missions.  Operation UGURAL was Canada's contribution to the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS).  The Canadian Forces initially loaned $1.4 million dollars worth of equipment and then sent 105 armoured fighting vehicles to the AU force.  The military also aided in strategic planning, air operations, contracting, logistics and operations, land operations, and trained AMIS soldiers on Canadian equipment.  In July 2004, a small number of Canadian Officers participated in the UN Advance Mission in Sudan that laid the groundwork for future peace operations.  Currently, Canada's Task Force Darfur is supporting UNAMID with 7 military personnel and 105 armoured vehicles.  Task Force Sudan is supporting UNMIS with 24 troops, including Lt. Colonel Randall Callan, the Force Legal Advisor.  Along with its military contribution, Canada also participates in humanitarian relief efforts and development.  The Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) is working to strengthen the Sudanese judiciary system, community security, federalism and the DDR program.
 
Despite its role, Canada has faced criticism both at home and abroad for not playing a leading role in Sudan.  Many critics accuse the Conservative government of diverting attention and resources away from peace operations and humanitarian work.  In 2004, Prime Minister Paul Martin (Liberal) used his speech before the UN General Assembly to encourage the international community to stop the violence in Darfur.  The current Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, has shifted focus away from Sudan and to Afghanistan.  His government argues that Afghanistan is a more pressing crisis and Canada does not have the troops or the resources to sustain operations in two countries.  Liberal Senator Roméo Dallaire, the Former UN Force Commander in Rwanda, rejects this claim.  More importantly, he argues that because Canada is a middle power with no history of colonialism, it needs to take a leading role in Sudan and rally other middle powers to contribute to the peace process and humanitarian aid.

 

 

 
 
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